The celebration of this day remains a way of 'remembering' so that we, as Americans don't forget how far we have come and to encourage youth to speak-up for human freedom and justice. -Renee Moore, Founder, Solomon Northup Day

Solomon Northup Day – A Celebration of Freedom, 1999 -
Solomon Northup Day – A Celebration of Freedom, 1999 -

The Event – A brief History

Based on the autobiography Twelve Years A Slave, 1853 by Solomon Northup

By Renee Moore, Founder
Solomon Northup Day 2014 - Press Release
Solomon Northup Day 2014 - Press Release

Community invited to celebrate Solomon Northup Day, July 19 A celebration of freedom featuring scholars, historians, films, youth activities, and more

Solomon Northup: ‘12 Years a Slave’ actress, panelists, descendants slated for July 19 events at Skidmore College
Solomon Northup: ‘12 Years a Slave’ actress, panelists, descendants slated for July 19 events at Skidmore College

Actress Devyn Tyler, from the Oscar-winning film “12 Years a Slave,” will give a personal account of her experiences making the movie during this year’s Solomon Northup Day activities scheduled for 12:30-6 p.m. on Saturday, July 19 at Skidmore College’s Filene Recital Hall.

By The Saratogian
Skidmore takes lead role in Solomon Northup Day
Skidmore takes lead role in Solomon Northup Day

...a grassroots effort to raise awareness of this compelling story has been going on for the past 15 years, in particular through Solomon Northup Day, an annual celebration launched in 1999 by Saratoga Springs resident and Skidmore College alumna Renee Moore.

By Skidmore College
12 Years a Slave spotlights Saratoga's black history
12 Years a Slave spotlights Saratoga's black history
Local residents who for years told the tragic but triumphant tale of a Saratoga violinist sold into slavery swelled with pride Monday after the story won Hollywood's top prize.
By Dennis Yusko - Times Union
Saratoga reflects on an Oscar winner
Saratoga reflects on an Oscar winner

“There was a lot of resistance in the early days,” Moore said Monday. “Precious few stood by me. I had no Ph.D at the end of my name, and black history isn’t something that has really been embraced.”

“I feel like I’m finally on the team that won,” said Johnnie Roberts, a city resident who for years publicized Northup’s story in the city’s visitors center. “I feel vindicated.”

By Dennis Yusko - Times Union
Probable Route Of Northup Kidnapping
Probable Route Of Northup Kidnapping

Map of Probable Route Of Northup Kidnapping in Washington DC 1841 (pdf)

Saratoga Springs Map - Solomon Northup's Narrative
Saratoga Springs Map - Solomon Northup's Narrative

1843 Saratoga Springs Map Showing  Locations In Soloman Northup’s Narrative (pdf)

New York Times Article (January 1853)
New York Times Article (January 1853)

The Kidnapping Case, Narriative of the Seizure and Recovery of Solomon Northrup (pdf)

New York Times Article (July 1854)
New York Times Article (July 1854)

Trial of the Suspected Kidnappers of Solomon Northup (pdf)

Frederick Douglass' Paper (April 28, 1854)
Frederick Douglass' Paper (April 1854)

Solomon Northup Petition (pdf)

Sue Eakin: 1918-2009
Sue Eakin: 1918-2009

Myrtle Sue Lyles Eakin, known as Sue Eakin (December 7, 1918–September 17, 2009), was an American professor, newspaper columnist, and historian from Bunkie in Avoyelles Parish. Sue Eakin is responsible for resurrecting the autobiography in 1968 in Louisiana thus brining Solomon's story to the forefront.

Ella Robinson Madison (1854-1933)
Ella Robinson Madison (1854-1933)

Ella is the sister-in-law to Alonzo Northup, her eldest sister was Victoria Northup, married to Solomon Northup. Ella's maiden name was Robinson and she grew up in Saratoga Springs, New York.

By Charles Ipcar
Solomon Northup Day: Local Legacies
Solomon Northup Day: Local Legacies

Solomon Northup was born a free man in Minerva, New York, in 1808. In 1841 he was kidnapped from Saratoga Springs, leaving behind a wife and three children.

By by Library of Congress, Bicentennial Celebration, Local Legacies recognition
New Map, App Feature NY Underground Railroad Sites
New Map, App Feature NY Underground Railroad Sites

Federal and state partners have recently released a new online map and mobile app to help people explore New York State’s connection to abolitionism and the Underground Railroad.

By The New York History Blog
Network to Freedom 2007
Network to Freedom 2007

In addition to preserving historic sites associated with the Underground Railroad, the NPS, through the Network to Freedom, attempts to tell a comprehensive story of the people and events associated with the struggle for freedom from enslavement.

By National Park Service
THINGS TO DO: Underground Railroad
THINGS TO DO: Underground Railroad

The story of the Underground Railroad is intimately tied to New York's canals. Thoughout the Corridor, you'll discover travel routes, hiding places, safe houses, and destinations for African Americans seeking to escape slavery in the 1800s.

By Erie Canalway
SOLOMON NORTHUP DAY - A Community Celebration
SOLOMON NORTHUP DAY - A Community Celebration

This event founded in 1999, includes an art exhibition, book display, and other historical and educational programs about Solomon Northup history, the abolitionist movement, the underground railroad and local African-American history and culture. Historians, academia, clergy and performers with a mid-program reception are apart of this educational program.

By Saratoga NYGenWeb Project
The True Story of the Man Behind '12 Years A Slave'
The True Story of the Man Behind '12 Years A Slave'

...In the late nineties, Moore set out to make Solomon Northup Day an official city holiday in Saratoga Springs—and she succeeded. Beginning in 1999, and ever since, there’s been an annual holiday and educational programs in his honor, thanks to Moore.

By the Take Away
Ex-Slave’s Harrowing Memoir Now a Hollywood Movie
Ex-Slave’s Harrowing Memoir Now a Hollywood Movie

In October, Fox Searchlight will release a film starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Alfre Woodard and Brad Pitt about a New York State resident, Solomon Northup, who was kidnapped in 1841 and sold into slavery.

By Nyack News and Views